Thursday, May 01, 2008

The Story of the Little Red Hen

Source: http://wardsmythe.com/2007/10/19/friday-whine-and-cheese-harry-reid-and-the-story-of-the-little-red-hen/

Once there was a Little Red Hen who lived in a barnyard with her three chicks and a duck, a pig and a cat.

One day the Little Red Hen found some grains of wheat. “Look look!” she clucked. “Who will help me plant this wheat?”

“Not I”, quacked the duck, and he waddled away.

“Not I”, oinked the pig, and he trotted away.

“Not I, meowed the cat, and he padded away.


“Then I will plant it myself,” said the Little Red Hen. And she did.

When the wheat was tall and golden, the Little Red Hen knew it was ready to be cut. “Who will help me cut the wheat?” she asked.

“Not I,” said the duck.

“Not I,” said the pig.

“Not I,” said the cat

“Then I will cut this wheat myself”. And she did.

“Now”, said the Little Red Hen, “it is time to take the wheat to the miller so he can grind it into flour. Who will help me?”

“Not I,” said the duck.

“Not I,” said the pig.

“Not I,” said the cat.

“Then I will take the wheat to the miller myself,” said the Little Red Hen. And she did.

The miller ground the wheat into fine white flour and put it into a sack for the Little Red Hen.

When she returned to the barnyard, the Little Red Hen asked, “Who will help me make this flour into dough?”

Not I,” said the duck, the pig and the cat all at once.

“Then I will make the dough myself,” said the Little Red Hen. And she did.

When the dough was ready to go into the oven, the Little Red Hen asked, “Who will help me bake the bread?”

“Not I,” said the duck.

“Not I,” said the pig.

“Not I,” said the cat.

“Then I wll bake it myself,” said the Little Red Hen. And she did.

Soon the bread was ready. As she took it from the oven, the Little Red Hen asked, “Well who wil help me eat this warm, fresh bread?”

“I will,” said the duck.

“I will,” said the pig.

“I will,” said the cat.

“No you won’t,” said the Little Red Hen. “You wouldn’t help me plant the seeds, cut the wheat, go to the miller, make the dough or bake the bread. Now, my three chicks and I will eat this bread ourselves!”

And that’s just what they did.

ANOTHER VERISON....

Once upon a time, on a farm in Texas, there was a little red hen who scratched about the barnyard until she uncovered quite a few grains of wheat. She called all of her neighbors together and said, "If we plant this wheat, we shall have bread to eat. Who will help me plant it?"

"Not I," said the cow.

"Not I," said the duck.

"Not I," said the pig.

"Not I," said the goose.

"Then I will do it by myself," said the little red hen and so she did. The wheat grew very tall and ripened into golden grain.

"Who will help me reap my wheat?" asked the little red hen.

"Not I," said the duck.

"Out of my classification," said the pig.

"I'd lose my seniority," said the cow.

"I'd lose my unemployment compensation," said the goose.

"Then I will do it by myself," said the little red hen, and so she did. At last it came time to bake the bread.

"Who will help me bake the bread?" asked the little red hen.

"That would be overtime for me," said the cow.

"I'd lose my welfare benefits," said the duck.

"I'm a dropout and never learned how," said the pig.

"If I'm to be the only helper, that's discrimination," said the goose.

"Then I will do it by myself," said the little red hen.

She baked five loaves and held them up for all of her neighbors to see. They wanted some and, in fact, demanded a share. But the little red hen said, "No, I shall eat all five loaves."

"Excess profits!" cried the cow

"Capitalist leech!" screamed the duck

"I demand equal rights!" yelled the goose.

The pig just grunted in disdain.

And they all painted "Unfair!" picket signs and marched around and around the little red hen, shouting obscenities.

Then a government agent came. He said to the little red hen, "You must not be so greedy."

"But I earned the bread," said the little red hen.

"Exactly," said the agent. "That is what makes our free enterprise system so wonderful. Anyone in the barnyard can earn as much as he wants. But under our modern government regulations, the productive workers must divide the fruits of their labor with those who are lazy and idle."

And they all lived happily ever after, including the little red hen, who smiled and clucked, "I am grateful, for now I truly understand."

But her neighbors became quite disappointed in her. She never again baked bread, because she joined the "party" and got her bread free. And all the Democrats smiled. 'Fairness' had been established. Individual initiative had died, but nobody noticed; perhaps no one cared ... so long as there was free bread that "the rich" were paying for.

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Philadelphia Radio Loses Another Legend

Bill's Pre-Comment: The following was copied and pasted from my MySpace page.
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Monday, April 28, 2008

Philadelphia Radio Loses Another Legend
Current mood: bummed
Category: Music


"Big" Ron O'Brien, afternoon jock on Philadelphia's 98.1 WOGL-FM and radio legend, died Sunday morning, April 27, from complications of pneumonia. He was 56 years old.

He was on from 3-7 PM during the week, and was known for his "Fab Four at Four" and "Forgotten 45" segements. For those who had the pleasure of listening to him, two things that stood out were his personality and sense of humor. After the "Forgotten 45", he would always have a trivia question that showed his vast knowledge of music.

There are a couple of tribute links, for the time being. www.wogl.com has a tribute page. Also, CBS-FM New York is playing his last Radio Greats Show, done this past December. The link is as follows: http://wcbsfm.com/Ron-O-Brien/2084423 .

Big Ron, you will be missed! Thank you for the good times.



Bill

Monday, April 28, 2008

Supreme Court upholds photo ID law for voters in Indiana

Supreme Court upholds photo ID law for voters in Indiana

By MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press Writer
7 minutes ago



The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states can require voters to produce photo identification without violating their constitutional rights, validating Republican-inspired voter ID laws.

In a splintered 6-3 ruling, the court upheld Indiana's strict photo ID requirement, which Democrats and civil rights groups said would deter poor, older and minority voters from casting ballots. Its backers said it was needed to prevent fraud.

It was the most important voting rights case since the Bush v. Gore dispute that sealed the 2000 election for George W. Bush. But the voter ID ruling lacked the conservative-liberal split that marked the 2000 case.

The law "is amply justified by the valid interest in protecting 'the integrity and reliability of the electoral process,'" Justice John Paul Stevens said in an opinion that was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Anthony Kennedy. Stevens was a dissenter in Bush v. Gore in 2000.

Justices Samuel Alito, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas also agreed with the outcome, but wrote separately.

Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and David Souter dissented, just as they did in 2000.

More than 20 states require some form of identification at the polls. Courts have upheld voter ID laws in Arizona, Georgia and Michigan, but struck down Missouri's. Monday's decision comes a week before Indiana's presidential primary.

The decision also could spur efforts to pass similar laws in other states.

Ken Falk, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana, said he hadn't reviewed the decision, but he was "extremely disappointed" by it. Falk has said voter ID laws inhibit voting, and a person's right to vote "is the most important right." The ACLU brought the case on behalf of Indiana voters.

The case concerned a state law, passed in 2005, that was backed by Republicans as a way to deter voter fraud. Democrats and civil rights groups opposed the law as unconstitutional and called it a thinly veiled effort to discourage elderly, poor and minority voters — those most likely to lack proper ID and who tend to vote for Democrats.

There is little history in Indiana of either in-person voter fraud — of the sort the law was designed to thwart — or voters being inconvenienced by the law's requirements. For the overwhelming majority of voters, an Indiana driver license serves as the identification.

"We cannot conclude that the statute imposes 'excessively burdensome requirements' on any class of voters," Stevens said.

Stevens' opinion suggests that the outcome could be different in a state where voters could provide evidence that their rights had been impaired.

But in dissent, Souter said Indiana's voter ID law "threatens to impose nontrivial burdens on the voting rights of tens of thousands of the state's citizens."

Scalia, favoring a broader ruling in defense of voter ID laws, said, "The universally applicable requirements of Indiana's voter-identification law are eminently reasonable. The burden of acquiring, possessing and showing a free photo identification is simply not severe, because it does not 'even represent a significant increase over the usual burdens of voting.'"

Stevens said the partisan divide in Indiana, as well as elsewhere, was noteworthy. But he said that preventing fraud and inspiring voter confidence were legitimate goals of the law, regardless of who backed or opposed it.

Indiana provides IDs free of charge to the poor and allows voters who lack photo ID to cast a provisional ballot and then show up within 10 days at their county courthouse to produce identification or otherwise attest to their identity.

Stevens said these provisions also help reduce the burden on people who lack driver licenses.



Copyright © 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
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Bill's Comment: TAKE THAT, DEMOCRATS!