Monday, February 22, 2016

Name your ism: Marxism, Communism, Socialism, Capitalism, Obamaism, etc By Jim Robinson


July 26, 2008

From the dictionary:


1. The political and economic philosophy of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in which the concept of class struggle plays a central role in understanding society's allegedly inevitable development from bourgeois oppression under capitalism to a socialist and ultimately classless society.


1. A theoretical economic system characterized by the collective ownership of property and by the organization of labor for the common advantage of all members. Communism

2. a) A system of government in which the state plans and controls the economy and a single, often authoritarian party holds power, claiming to make progress toward a higher social order in which all goods are equally shared by the people. b) The Marxist-Leninist version of Communist doctrine that advocates the overthrow of capitalism by the revolution of the proletariat.


1. Any of various theories or systems of social organization in which the means of producing and distributing goods is owned collectively or by a centralized government that often plans and controls the economy.

2. The stage in Marxist-Leninist theory intermediate between capitalism and communism, in which collective ownership of the economy under the dictatorship of the proletariat has not yet been successfully achieved.


1. An economic system in which the means of production and distribution are privately or corporately owned and development is proportionate to the accumulation and reinvestment of profits gained in a free market.


1. The condition of being free of restraints.

2. Liberty of the person from slavery, detention, or oppression.

3. a) Political independence. b) Exemption from the arbitrary exercise of authority in the performance of a specific action; civil liberty: freedom of assembly.


1. a) The condition of being free from restriction or control. b) The right and power to act, believe, or express oneself in a manner of one's own choosing. c) The condition of being physically and legally free from confinement, servitude, or forced labor. See synonyms at freedom.

2. Freedom from unjust or undue governmental control.

3. A right or immunity to engage in certain actions without control or interference: the liberties protected by the Bill of Rights.


1. a) A political order whose head of state is not a monarch and in modern times is usually a president. b) A nation that has such a political order.

2. a) A political order in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them. b) A nation that has such a political order.

Constitution of the United States of America

Fundamental law of the U.S. federal system of government and a landmark document of the Western world. It is the oldest written national constitution in operation, completed in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention of 55 delegates who met in Philadelphia, ostensibly to amend the Articles of Confederation. The Constitution was ratified in June 1788, but because ratification in many states was contingent on the promised addition of a Bill of Rights, Congress proposed 12 amendments in September 1789; 10 were ratified by the states, and their adoption was certified on Dec. 15, 1791. The framers were especially concerned with limiting the power of the government and securing the liberty of citizens. The Constitution's separation of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, the checks and balances of each branch against the other, and the explicit guarantees of individual liberty were all designed to strike a balance between authority and liberty. Article I vests all legislative powers in the Congress — the House of Representatives and the Senate. Article II vests executive power in the president. Article III places judicial power in the hands of the courts. Article IV deals, in part, with relations among the states and with the privileges of the citizens, Article V with amendment procedure, and Article VI with public debts and the supremacy of the Constitution. Article VII stipulates that the Constitution would become operational after being ratified by nine states. The 10th Amendment limits the national government's powers to those expressly listed in the Constitution; the states, unless otherwise restricted, possess all the remaining (or "residual") powers of government. Amendments to the Constitution may be proposed by a two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress or by a convention called by Congress on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the states. (All subsequent amendments have been initiated by Congress.) Amendments proposed by Congress must be ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures or by conventions in as many states. Twenty-seven amendments have been added to the Constitution since 1789. In addition to the Bill of Rights, these include the 13th (1865), abolishing slavery; the 14th (1868), requiring due process and equal protection under the law; the 15th (1870), guaranteeing the right to vote regardless of race; the 17th (1913), providing for the direct election of U.S. senators; the 19th (1920), instituting women's suffrage, and the 22nd (1951), limiting the presidency to two terms.

Obamaism (see also abomination)

A belief that the Constitution of the United States of America is obsolete, that capitalism exploits and oppresses the ignorant masses, that government knows better than the people on how to conduct their private affairs, that centralized government planning and control of the economy is superior to free markets, that free republics are evil and racist, that self-defense, national defense, national security are the tools of hateful war mongers, that nations should erase their borders, destroy their means of national defense, dissolve their constitutions and submit to control by world governments, that the ideas of freedom, free nations, free people, liberty, capitalism, etc, are failures that should be replaced by world government control, socialism, Marxism, etc. Can't we all just get along?

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